PBA 67 in the NEWS !!!

"Operation Santa Boone"
Pays a Visit to a Family
in Need



Credit- Fair Lawn Patch

http://fairlawn.patch.com/ When Liz Twiggs, coordinator of the Fair Lawn Food Pantry, found out that one of her clients couldn't afford a Christmas tree this holiday season, she sprung into action and launched, "Operation Santa Boone."

With the help of Detective David Boone and food pantry volunteer Beri Raffiani, Twiggs procured a 7.5-foot pre-lit tree, a wreath, two shopping cartloads of food, some small gifts and an additional top secret Christmas gift (to be opened on Christmas Day) for her client, Theresa, and Theresa's family.

On Dec. 6, the crew (Twiggs and her daughter Bridget Maresca dressed as elves, Boone dressed as Santa and Raffiani as herself) launched "Operation Santa Boone" -- a surprise night-time delivery of the items.

Members of the Fair Lawn Rescue Squad

assisted with the dramatic delivery in their vehicle.

Watch the video to see "Operation Santa Boone" unfold.

Members of the

http://fairlawn.patch.com/articles/video-operation-santa-boone#video-8683645



Friday, December 2, 2011

Members of Fair Lawn PBA Local 67 and their invited guests enjoyed a outstanding night of comedy, great food and brotherhood at the Fair Lawn Athletic Club. President Boone presented Retired Officer Glen Callons and Retired Sergeant Michael Messina with their retirement badges and wished both an abundance of health, happiness and the best of luck as they enjoy their retirement from law enforcement and pursue new job opportunities.

Deanna Marie received a special award from President Boone for her generous contributions to PBA Local 67.

Brother Lonnie Mergler was welcomed aboard as Fair Lawn PD's newest Sergeant.

Our newest award of recognition called; "Friend in Media" was awarded to Jerry Demarco, Publisher/Editor of the Cliffview Pilot. The Cliffview Pilot is an online breaking news media outlet. Jerry has been a huge proponent of public safety and has been credited with his fair and honest reporting time and time again.

Some of the many dignitaries that enjoyed the evening included our many Silver Life Card Members, Keith Dunn, Executive Vice President of the New Jersey State PBA, John Feehan, New Jersey Transit PBA President, Craig Weber, Ramsey PBA President, Nick Felice, former State Assemblymen and Fair Lawn Mayor, John Cosgrove, Fair Lawn Councilmen-Elect, and Robert Vanhouten, Retired Fair Lawn Police Chief.

A special thank you to all of our add journal contributors as well as Caputo's Catering, American Graphics and
A&J Mobile Disk Jockey Entertainment for their
outstanding services.

Here are some pictures of the dinner!



Fair Lawn Officer Lonnie Mergler promoted to Sergeant. Two new officers sworn in
to the Fair Lawn Police Department

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Last evening, Lonnie Mergler, a 17 year veteran of the Fair Lawn Police Department was promoted to Sergeant at a regular meeting of the Fair Lawn Mayor & Council. Lonnie was promoted to replace an open vacancy in the patrol supervision.

Mr. Juan Rodriguez and Mr. Luke Hintzen were sworn in as Fair Lawn's two newest Police Officers. Both Hintzen and Rodriguez were formerly employed as Paterson Police Officers prior to being laid off. Both were hired to replace retired officer positions.

After a brief swearing in, everyone was invited back for a congratulatory party at the Athletic Club hosted by
PBA Local 67 President David Boone.

Congratulations to all!



 SOA Member Derek Bastinck & Fair Lawn PBA Member Glenn Callons
(shown above) are escorting the torch to benefit Special Olympics.

June 10, 2011

Nineteen legs of the Law Enforcement Torch Run to benefit New Jersey Special Olympics set off early Friday morning, on the way to covering a combined 722.6 miles of road statewide.

http://cliffviewpilot.com/bergen/2455-law-enforcement-torch-run-covers-700-miles-for-new-jersey-special-olympics





Police Unity Tour 2011: Doing for Others

celebrating logo

May 4, 2011

Fair Lawn Police Sergeant Michael Messina
and PO Ken Cavanaugh are Awarded the Meritorious Service Award by the
200 Club of Bergen County




On September 1, 2010 at 7:13 p.m. Sergeant Michael Messina was detailed to a local pharmacy as a report came in of a women attempting to pass a counterfeit prescription for Oxycodone. Once she was pointed out to Sgt. Messina, he followed the suspect into the parking lot. Attempting to stop her, she ignored his commands and entered a waiting vehicle in the parking lot. Coincidentally, Police Officer Kenneth Cavanaugh was in the parking lot on another call when he saw what was happening. PO Cavanaugh attempted to apprehend the woman who got into the passenger side of the waiting vehicle. The driver of the vehicle put the car in reverse and with the passenger side door still open, knocked PO Cavanaugh down onto the ground almost running him over in the process of trying to flee the scene. As the vehicle drove forward, Sgt. Messina was on foot and ordered the driver to stop when she accelerated rapidly headed directly towards him. Sgt. Messina fired two shots at the vehicle before he was struck and thrown over the hood of the vehicle as it fled the scene.

Several witnesses provided a description of the vehicle that fled the scene with a partial license plate number. Investigators were led to two female suspects where they were arrested and charged with attempted murder, armed robbery, aggravated assault on a police officer, resisting arrest, attempted
theft by deception and forgery.

Meritorious Service Award
An act demonstrating a high level of courage under perilour conditions that is a credit to him or her and their agency and or being instrumental in saving a life above and beyond the call of duty.

Press Coverage by Jerry DeMarco, Editor of the Cliffview Pilot

http://cliffviewpilot.com/bergen/2343-fair-lawn-officers-honored-for-bravery-by-the-200-club-of-bergen-county

Annual Officer Collura Memorial Set for April 17

The service will take place at 3 p.m. on the grounds of Van Riper Ellis/Broadway Baptist Church

Fair Lawn Policemen's Benevolent Association Local #67 President David G. Boone has announced that the annual Officer Mary Ann Collura Memorial Service will be held…

PBA Sister Karen Censullo walks for Strides against cancer
Tuesday, November 9, 2010
Community News (Fair Lawn Edition)

 Strides against cancer

 Fair Lawn Police Department Detective Karen Cansullo (left) was among the participants in the American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K walk at Bergen Community College on Oct. 24.

NICK MESSINA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Fair Lawn Police Department Detective Karen Cansullo (left) was among the participants in the American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K walk at Bergen Community College on Oct. 24.

 
 
SAFETY FIRST!
Thursday, November 4, 2010
Community News (Fair Lawn Edition)

Fair Lawn Officer Gerard Graziano speaks to students at Forrest School on Oct. 28 about Halloween safety. Through the week before Halloween officers visited the elementary schools to distribute glow sticks.

October 13, 2010
Congratulations to newly appointed Bergen County Police Officer Chris Sullivan!

Chris, a former 3 year veteran Fair Lawn Officer 
laid off on September 1st was appointed to the rolls of the Bergen County Police Department! In the picture above, PBA Local 67 President David Boone stands with Chris, Fair Lawn Police Officer Vasquez and former Fair Lawn Officers Chris Chan and Justin Garcia, now employed by Bergen County.

Detective Capt. Anthony Serrao retiring after 30 years with department. Tuesday, October 12, 2010
more:

September 28, 2010

Fair Lawn PBA Members Promoted at Recent Swearing In!

Lt. Glen Cauwels was promoted to Captain
Sgt. Michael Uttel was promoted to Det/Lieutenant
Sgt. Derek Bastinck was promoted to Lieutenant
Sgt. Brian Larosa was promoted to Lieutenant
PO Joseph Dawicki was promoted to Sergeant
PO James Krizek was promoted to Sergeant
PO Paul Scott was promoted to Sergeant
PO Eric Leitmann was promoted to Sergeant

Congratulations to all!

 
 
 


 
Police picket again over layoffs of four officers
Tuesday, September 14, 2010
The Record
Staff Writer

President of PBA critical of council for not checking on injured sergeant

Fair Lawn - Police picketed borough hall again on Sept. 7 - the second time in two weeks - over the layoff of four officers earlier this month.

While police and their supporters have pressured the borough to reverse the layoff plan, the governing body has refused to relent citing fiscal hardship due to $1.2 million in state aid cuts, reduced return on investments, and a generally depressed economy.

Staffing for the department will be reduced to 55 officers as a result of the layoffs and three retirements, according to borough officials. The department will compensate for staff reductions by increasing overtime and eliminating the D.A.R.E. program.

Borough officials claim that employees agreed to take 14 furlough days in order to stymie layoffs for the current year, adding that the police unions refused to accept offers of five furlough days and, later, four furlough days with an anticipated savings of $132,000.

The Policeman's Benevolent Association (PBA) and the Superior Officer's Association (SOA) - the police union for sergeants, lieutenants, and captains - claim that decreasing staffing rates and implementing four furlough days would put on-duty officers at risk due to reduced backup in an emergency.

Additionally, only an hour after a layoff protest finished on Sept. 1, two officers were struck by a vehicle operated by a pair of women who attempted to pass a bad prescription at a local Walgreens. Patrol Officer Kenneth Cavanaugh was taking a report of an unrelated car accident near the scene when he responded and was later knocked to the ground when the pair's vehicle reversed into him. The other officer, Sgt. Michael Messina, was nearly run down by the vehicle when the driver gunned it forward. Messina fired two shots into the windshield while riding on the front hood.

The duo - Priscilla Coleman, 31, of Newark and Cyrinthia Marlin, 30, of Newark - were later apprehended and charged with attempted murder and other charges.

A Sept. 2 memo from Police Chief Erik Rose to Borough Tim Stafford states that the department "has a minimum staffing level" and, on the evening of Sept. 1, the available staffing was "above the minimum staffing level."

However, police said Messina responded to the incident from headquarters without backup while Cavanaugh was only present at the scene by chance. Additionally, Police Officer Alan Annazone - one of the officers laid off on Sept. 1 - would have been scheduled to work that shift, authorities said.

While borough officials place blame solely on the economy and state cuts, much of the labor discussion is overshadowed by the uncertain status of the police contract, which expired on Dec. 31, 2008.

David Boone, president of the PBA Local 67, said he believed the governing body wanted the union to acquiesce to furloughs in order to weaken the unions' position in future bargaining. Both sides are awaiting state arbitration on the contract this October.

Boone has stated the municipality initially agreed to settle the police contract in April - an agreement that the police unions ratified - but the governing body failed to bring it to a vote.

In response to the stalled negotiations and mistrust on both sides, the unions have filed unfair labor charges against the municipality claiming that the borough negotiated "in bad faith" by failing to ratify the contract and that the change in employee health insurance has not met a contracted requirement of "equal or better coverage."

Boone claimed that the police union had agreed to concessions in the contract the municipality failed to ratify, which he stated were worth between $160,000 and $180,000 for this year. Boone said he could not disclose the nature of the concessions the unions offered since the contract was not settled.

"Why are we going to arbitration?" Boone said. "Just sign the contract. We're willing to help the town."

Borough officials have dismissed Boone's claims.

Boone offered further criticism of the governing body at the work session on Sept. 7, at which he read a letter authored by Messina's wife, Noreen.

Noreen Messina said the mayor and council and Borough Manager Tim Stafford did not attempt to visit or contact her husband following his injuries. Nick Messina, the officer's father and Community News staff photographer, said he had received support and concern from numerous officials from neighboring municipalities but none from Fair Lawn.

Mayor Joe Tedeschi responded that he had attempted to contact members of the Messina family but his calls were not picked up. Noreen and the elder Messina agreed they had not answered Tedeschi's calls.

Other council members claimed they had been advised to avoid contacting Messina after Police Chief Erik Rose was barred from visiting him in the hospital by subordinate police officers.

Messina's relationship with the municipality is the subject of animosity by some in the borough due to a lawsuit he filed against Rose and the town in 2008. Messina said he performed the work of a lieutenant for several years without proper compensation while in the detective bureau and, after he filed a desk audit with the state, became the subject of harassment by Rose. Messina claims Rose torpedoed his desk audit with a letter sent to state officials and that the borough failed to provide him a copy of the letter, in accordance with the law. After the desk audit was dismissed, Messina said he received a retaliatory transfer out of the detective bureau by Rose.

A jury agreed with Messina this past spring and awarded him nearly $550,000 in damages. Officials say they are appealing the verdict.

E-mail: zaremba@northjersey.com

President of PBA critical of council for not checking on injured sergeant

The Fair Lawn PBA hosted a demonstration protesting the elimination of four police jobs prior to the council work session on Sept. 7.
NICK MESSINA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Buy this photo
The Fair Lawn PBA hosted a demonstration protesting the elimination of four police jobs prior to the council work session on Sept. 7.

Fair Lawn - Police picketed borough hall again on Sept. 7 - the second time in two weeks - over the layoff of four officers earlier this month.

While police and their supporters have pressured the borough to reverse the layoff plan, the governing body has refused to relent citing fiscal hardship due to $1.2 million in state aid cuts, reduced return on investments, and a generally depressed economy.

Staffing for the department will be reduced to 55 officers as a result of the layoffs and three retirements, according to borough officials. The department will compensate for staff reductions by increasing overtime and eliminating the D.A.R.E. program.

Borough officials claim that employees agreed to take 14 furlough days in order to stymie layoffs for the current year, adding that the police unions refused to accept offers of five furlough days and, later, four furlough days with an anticipated savings of $132,000.

The Policeman's Benevolent Association (PBA) and the Superior Officer's Association (SOA) - the police union for sergeants, lieutenants, and captains - claim that decreasing staffing rates and implementing four furlough days would put on-duty officers at risk due to reduced backup in an emergency.

Additionally, only an hour after a layoff protest finished on Sept. 1, two officers were struck by a vehicle operated by a pair of women who attempted to pass a bad prescription at a local Walgreens. Patrol Officer Kenneth Cavanaugh was taking a report of an unrelated car accident near the scene when he responded and was later knocked to the ground when the pair's vehicle reversed into him. The other officer, Sgt. Michael Messina, was nearly run down by the vehicle when the driver gunned it forward. Messina fired two shots into the windshield while riding on the front hood.

The duo - Priscilla Coleman, 31, of Newark and Cyrinthia Marlin, 30, of Newark - were later apprehended and charged with attempted murder and other charges.

A Sept. 2 memo from Police Chief Erik Rose to Borough Tim Stafford states that the department "has a minimum staffing level" and, on the evening of Sept. 1, the available staffing was "above the minimum staffing level."

However, police said Messina responded to the incident from headquarters without backup while Cavanaugh was only present at the scene by chance. Additionally, Police Officer Alan Annazone - one of the officers laid off on Sept. 1 - would have been scheduled to work that shift, authorities said.

While borough officials place blame solely on the economy and state cuts, much of the labor discussion is overshadowed by the uncertain status of the police contract, which expired on Dec. 31, 2008.

David Boone, president of the PBA Local 67, said he believed the governing body wanted the union to acquiesce to furloughs in order to weaken the unions' position in future bargaining. Both sides are awaiting state arbitration on the contract this October.

Boone has stated the municipality initially agreed to settle the police contract in April - an agreement that the police unions ratified - but the governing body failed to bring it to a vote.

In response to the stalled negotiations and mistrust on both sides, the unions have filed unfair labor charges against the municipality claiming that the borough negotiated "in bad faith" by failing to ratify the contract and that the change in employee health insurance has not met a contracted requirement of "equal or better coverage."

Boone claimed that the police union had agreed to concessions in the contract the municipality failed to ratify, which he stated were worth between $160,000 and $180,000 for this year. Boone said he could not disclose the nature of the concessions the unions offered since the contract was not settled.

"Why are we going to arbitration?" Boone said. "Just sign the contract. We're willing to help the town."

Borough officials have dismissed Boone's claims.

Boone offered further criticism of the governing body at the work session on Sept. 7, at which he read a letter authored by Messina's wife, Noreen.

Noreen Messina said the mayor and council and Borough Manager Tim Stafford did not attempt to visit or contact her husband following his injuries. Nick Messina, the officer's father and Community News staff photographer, said he had received support and concern from numerous officials from neighboring municipalities but none from Fair Lawn.

Mayor Joe Tedeschi responded that he had attempted to contact members of the Messina family but his calls were not picked up. Noreen and the elder Messina agreed they had not answered Tedeschi's calls.

Other council members claimed they had been advised to avoid contacting Messina after Police Chief Erik Rose was barred from visiting him in the hospital by subordinate police officers.

Messina's relationship with the municipality is the subject of animosity by some in the borough due to a lawsuit he filed against Rose and the town in 2008. Messina said he performed the work of a lieutenant for several years without proper compensation while in the detective bureau and, after he filed a desk audit with the state, became the subject of harassment by Rose. Messina claims Rose torpedoed his desk audit with a letter sent to state officials and that the borough failed to provide him a copy of the letter, in accordance with the law. After the desk audit was dismissed, Messina said he received a retaliatory transfer out of the detective bureau by Rose.

A jury agreed with Messina this past spring and awarded him nearly $550,000 in damages. Officials say they are appealing the verdict.

E-mail: zaremba@northjersey.com
_____________________________________________________________

Last day for 4 Fair Lawn cops
Thursday, September 2, 2010
The Record
STAFF WRITER

FAIR LAWN — Four borough police officers handed in their badges Wednesday morning, hours after a borough-imposed deadline passed for the police union to accept a department-wide furlough to save the officers' jobs.

Two of the laid-off officers and other police representatives said they received no word from borough officials after the midnight deadline passed, but the police union marked the occasion with a widely publicized demonstration in front of Borough Hall.

Wearing T-shirts that said "Un-Fair Lawn" and waving signs with slogans such as "Crime Doesn't Lay Off," police and their supporters said the layoffs, combined with several recent police retirements, would result in a dramatic reduction in police services and could cost the borough more in overtime and other expenses than it would save in salaries.

"It's just frustrating," Police Chief Erik Rose said. "The guys are trying to do the best jobs they can, and it just destroys the morale of the police officers."

The layoffs and retirements will reduce the department to 55 officers from a high of 64 in July 2009, Rose said. He added that staffing levels have not been so low in almost 30 years.

Mayor Joseph Tedeschi said in a statement that the layoffs could have been avoided if the police union agreed to four unpaid days off, compared with the 14 days that most other employees are taking and 18 days for library employees.

"We have been fair to everyone: our residents, our employees and our senior citizens," the statement said. "Perhaps it's time for the PBA to be fair to their brother officers."

The PBA has maintained that the borough could make up for $1.2 million in cuts to the 2010 budget without any furloughs or layoffs, and that reducing officers' working hours could put on-duty officers at risk of not having enough backup if something went wrong.

Robert Iozzia and Alan Annazone, two of the laid-off officers, said they would not expect the PBA to make what they said were unreasonable concessions to save their jobs.

"They have our backs," Iozzia said. "We wouldn't expect them to fold for a bully mayor and council."

The police also said three recent officers' announcements that they would retire should have made the layoffs and furloughs unnecessary, because the borough would save money from high-ranking officer salaries.

Tedeschi said such speculation does not take into account as much as $300,000 the borough must pay the retiring officers for unpaid sick, vacation and comp time.

"Once an officer retires, that doesn't mean he stops getting paid," Tedeschi said.

"We don't have the money."

E-mail: akin@northjersey.com

FAIR LAWN — Four borough police officers handed in their badges Wednesday morning, hours after a borough-imposed deadline passed for the police union to accept a department-wide furlough to save the officers' jobs.

Fair Lawn's police union demonstrating in front of Borough Hall. Police Chief Erik Rose says the layoffs are destroying morale.
STAFF PHOTOS BY CARMINE GALASSO
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Fair Lawn's police union demonstrating in front of Borough Hall. Police Chief Erik Rose says the layoffs are destroying morale.

Two of the laid-off officers and other police representatives said they received no word from borough officials after the midnight deadline passed, but the police union marked the occasion with a widely publicized demonstration in front of Borough Hall.

Wearing T-shirts that said "Un-Fair Lawn" and waving signs with slogans such as "Crime Doesn't Lay Off," police and their supporters said the layoffs, combined with several recent police retirements, would result in a dramatic reduction in police services and could cost the borough more in overtime and other expenses than it would save in salaries.

"It's just frustrating," Police Chief Erik Rose said. "The guys are trying to do the best jobs they can, and it just destroys the morale of the police officers."

The layoffs and retirements will reduce the department to 55 officers from a high of 64 in July 2009, Rose said. He added that staffing levels have not been so low in almost 30 years.

Alan Annazone, left, and Robert Iozzia were two of the police officers laid off. Buy this photo
Alan Annazone, left, and Robert Iozzia were two of the police officers laid off.

Mayor Joseph Tedeschi said in a statement that the layoffs could have been avoided if the police union agreed to four unpaid days off, compared with the 14 days that most other employees are taking and 18 days for library employees.

"We have been fair to everyone: our residents, our employees and our senior citizens," the statement said. "Perhaps it's time for the PBA to be fair to their brother officers."

The PBA has maintained that the borough could make up for $1.2 million in cuts to the 2010 budget without any furloughs or layoffs, and that reducing officers' working hours could put on-duty officers at risk of not having enough backup if something went wrong.

Robert Iozzia and Alan Annazone, two of the laid-off officers, said they would not expect the PBA to make what they said were unreasonable concessions to save their jobs.

"They have our backs," Iozzia said. "We wouldn't expect them to fold for a bully mayor and council."

The police also said three recent officers' announcements that they would retire should have made the layoffs and furloughs unnecessary, because the borough would save money from high-ranking officer salaries.

Tedeschi said such speculation does not take into account as much as $300,000 the borough must pay the retiring officers for unpaid sick, vacation and comp time.

"Once an officer retires, that doesn't mean he stops getting paid," Tedeschi said.

"We don't have the money."

E-mail: akin@northjersey.com


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_____________________________________________________________
Two women accused of attempted murder of Fair Lawn police officer
Thursday, September 2, 2010
Last updated: Friday September 3, 2010, 9:37 PM
The Record
STAFF WRITERS

Two women have been arrested in connection with the attempted murder Wednesday of a police officer outside a Walgreen’s pharmacy in Fair Lawn.

Cyrinthia Marlin, 30, and Priscilla Coleman, 31, both of Newark, were taken into custody hours after the 7:13 p.m. incident, which left two Fair Lawn Police officers hospitalized.

The officers were responding to a call at the pharmacy at 17-77 River Road to investigate Marlin, who allegedly was attempting to pass a fraudulent prescription for Oxycodone.

When police arrived, Marlin fled to a waiting vehicle in the parking lot driven by Coleman, Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli said.

“The driver immediately backed up, knocking the officer to the ground,” Molinelli said.

Fair Lawn Police Sgt Mike Messina also was near the car, Molinelli said, adding that Coleman accelerated rapidly and directly at Messina, who fired two rounds at the vehicle just before being struck and thrown over the hood to the ground, Molinelli said.

Witnesses provided a description of the car — a maroon 2003 Lexus — that fled the scene and was later found by authorities in a Newark parking lot with two bullet holes.

Both officers were taken to The Valley Hospital.

Officer Kenneth Cavanagh was released after treatment Wednesday and returned to work Thursday morning, said Detective David Boone, president of Local 67 of the Police Benevolent Association.

Messina was released Thursday after an overnight stay at the hospital.

“They were both pretty bruised up,” Boone said.

The police union had just wrapped up a demonstration against the layoff of four officers and were holding a meeting down the street when the call came over the radio that an officer had been shot, Boone said. About 30 officers fled to the scene, he said.

Boone said the incident supported the PBA’s stance against the layoffs or the borough-proposed alternative of unpaid days off for all police officers, which the PBA says would put on-duty officers at risk of not having enough backup if something went wrong.

“The irony is, this is the message we’re trying to get across,” Boone said.

Mayor Joseph Tedeschi declined to comment on the layoffs, but said he was happy to hear that the suspects had been caught and that the officers were recovering.

Coleman and Marlin were formally charged in state Superior Court in Hackensack with attempted murder, armed robbery, aggravated assault on a police officer, eluding and producing a forged prescription. Both entered not-guilty pleas through their lawyers.

Judge Liliana S. DeAvila-Silebi ordered them held at the Bergen County Jail on $1 million bail each.

Staff Writer Kibret Markos contributed to this article. E-mail: coutros@northjersey.com and akin@northjersey.com

Two women have been arrested in connection with the attempted murder Wednesday of a police officer outside a Walgreen’s pharmacy in Fair Lawn.

Cyrinthia Marlin, left, and Priscilla Coleman appear in Superior Court in Hackensack on Thursday.
ELIZABETH LARA / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
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Cyrinthia Marlin, left, and Priscilla Coleman appear in Superior Court in Hackensack on Thursday.

Cyrinthia Marlin, 30, and Priscilla Coleman, 31, both of Newark, were taken into custody hours after the 7:13 p.m. incident, which left two Fair Lawn Police officers hospitalized.

The officers were responding to a call at the pharmacy at 17-77 River Road to investigate Marlin, who allegedly was attempting to pass a fraudulent prescription for Oxycodone.

When police arrived, Marlin fled to a waiting vehicle in the parking lot driven by Coleman, Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli said.

“The driver immediately backed up, knocking the officer to the ground,” Molinelli said.

Fair Lawn Police Sgt Mike Messina also was near the car, Molinelli said, adding that Coleman accelerated rapidly and directly at Messina, who fired two rounds at the vehicle just before being struck and thrown over the hood to the ground, Molinelli said.

Witnesses provided a description of the car — a maroon 2003 Lexus — that fled the scene and was later found by authorities in a Newark parking lot with two bullet holes.

Both officers were taken to The Valley Hospital.

Officer Kenneth Cavanagh was released after treatment Wednesday and returned to work Thursday morning, said Detective David Boone, president of Local 67 of the Police Benevolent Association.

Messina was released Thursday after an overnight stay at the hospital.

“They were both pretty bruised up,” Boone said.

The police union had just wrapped up a demonstration against the layoff of four officers and were holding a meeting down the street when the call came over the radio that an officer had been shot, Boone said. About 30 officers fled to the scene, he said.

Boone said the incident supported the PBA’s stance against the layoffs or the borough-proposed alternative of unpaid days off for all police officers, which the PBA says would put on-duty officers at risk of not having enough backup if something went wrong.

“The irony is, this is the message we’re trying to get across,” Boone said.

Mayor Joseph Tedeschi declined to comment on the layoffs, but said he was happy to hear that the suspects had been caught and that the officers were recovering.

Coleman and Marlin were formally charged in state Superior Court in Hackensack with attempted murder, armed robbery, aggravated assault on a police officer, eluding and producing a forged prescription. Both entered not-guilty pleas through their lawyers.

Judge Liliana S. DeAvila-Silebi ordered them held at the Bergen County Jail on $1 million bail each.

Staff Writer Kibret Markos contributed to this article. E-mail: coutros@northjersey.com and akin@northjersey.com
_____________________________________________________________

PBA continues to fight the plan to lay off four officers
Thursday, August 12, 2010
Last updated: Thursday August 12, 2010, 1:20 AM
Community News (Fair Lawn Edition)
STAFF WRITERS

Fair Lawn — The state president of the Policeman's Benevolent Association (PBA) said at a press conference on Aug. 2 that the council is "looking for trouble" by laying off four police officers.

"We need to get the word out to the community that this is happening," State PBA President Anthony Weiner said. "The community needs to know that their town council has voted to get rid of cops in a time where crime, by all indication, stands a good chance in rising. The Fair Lawn Police Department hasn't seen a department this small since the 1970s when crime was bad due to the explosion in population. Right now, the town might not be under going a massive population boom, but Paterson is right over the border and problems do arise. By cutting the number of officers the town has, the council is looking for trouble."

Nearly 40 police officers, most of whom were dressed in uniform, attended the press conference at the PBA Local 67 office on Fair Lawn Avenue to protest the proposed layoff of four police officers on Sept. 1.

Detective David G. Boone, president of Fair Lawn PBA Local 67, said fewer officers is a cause for concern for residents.

"I am worried with these additional layoffs, the Fair Lawn Police Department will be down a total of 10 officers, a number not seen since the 1970s," Boone said. "With the economy going the way it is and with the police force being diminished, crime will rise causing a problem for the township and the residents of Fair Lawn."

The PBA and Superior Officer's Association (SOA) – the police union for sergeants, lieutenants and captains – have previously suggested the borough is attempting to force the police department to agree to voluntary furloughs and using the proposed layoff of four police officers as leverage. Emergency service personnel are exempt from mandatory furloughs, according to state law.

The borough has slashed costs following receipt of $1.2 million in state aid cuts by furloughing borough employees and switching employee health insurance from Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield to a self-funded insurance program administrated by Insurance Design Administrators.

The PBA and SOA have opposed furloughs and a switch in health insurance.

Additionally, Boone has criticized the borough's proposed layoff plan, which cited the reduced number of tickets issued by the police department over the past two years as the reason for the layoffs.

The number of tickets issued by police officers dropped since 2008 resulting in loss of approximately $460,000 over the past two years, according to internal borough memos. Some borough officials believe there is a connection to the drop-off in summonses issued and stalled negotiations over the police officers' contract, which expired on Dec. 31, 2008.

Boone has stated that fewer tickets were issued in the borough due to poor morale in the police department.

Mayor Joe Tedeschi rejected Boone's claims that low morale caused the reduced number of tickets for the past 78 weeks from January 2009 through June 2010.

"They've only known about the layoffs for the past 10 weeks," Tedeschi said.

A contract resolution appeared to be on the horizon in April with the borough and PBA and SOA reaching a proposed agreement. Negotiations stalled again after the PBA and SOA ratified the agreement, while the mayor and council refused to bring the agreement to a vote.

In June, the PBA and SOA filed unfair labor practice charges with the state against the borough, claiming the borough is negotiating "in bad faith." The borough and PBA and SOA are scheduled for arbitration of the police officers' contract in October.

Tedeschi declined to comment further on the situation, stating only, "Sooner or later we're going to resolve this. Sooner or later we're going to have to heal. Why make the fire bigger?"

E-mail: liebowitz@northjersey.com and zaremba@northjersey.com

Fair Lawn — The state president of the Policeman's Benevolent Association (PBA) said at a press conference on Aug. 2 that the council is "looking for trouble" by laying off four police officers.

Fair Lawn officers hold signs of support during the press conference on Aug. 2. State PBA President Anthony Weiner speaks at the press conference regarding the scheduled layoff of four Fair Lawn officers.
NICK MESSINA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Fair Lawn officers hold signs of support during the press conference on Aug. 2. State PBA President Anthony Weiner speaks at the press conference regarding the scheduled layoff of four Fair Lawn officers.

"We need to get the word out to the community that this is happening," State PBA President Anthony Weiner said. "The community needs to know that their town council has voted to get rid of cops in a time where crime, by all indication, stands a good chance in rising. The Fair Lawn Police Department hasn't seen a department this small since the 1970s when crime was bad due to the explosion in population. Right now, the town might not be under going a massive population boom, but Paterson is right over the border and problems do arise. By cutting the number of officers the town has, the council is looking for trouble."

Nearly 40 police officers, most of whom were dressed in uniform, attended the press conference at the PBA Local 67 office on Fair Lawn Avenue to protest the proposed layoff of four police officers on Sept. 1.

Detective David G. Boone, president of Fair Lawn PBA Local 67, said fewer officers is a cause for concern for residents.

"I am worried with these additional layoffs, the Fair Lawn Police Department will be down a total of 10 officers, a number not seen since the 1970s," Boone said. "With the economy going the way it is and with the police force being diminished, crime will rise causing a problem for the township and the residents of Fair Lawn."

The PBA and Superior Officer's Association (SOA) – the police union for sergeants, lieutenants and captains – have previously suggested the borough is attempting to force the police department to agree to voluntary furloughs and using the proposed layoff of four police officers as leverage. Emergency service personnel are exempt from mandatory furloughs, according to state law.

The borough has slashed costs following receipt of $1.2 million in state aid cuts by furloughing borough employees and switching employee health insurance from Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield to a self-funded insurance program administrated by Insurance Design Administrators.

The PBA and SOA have opposed furloughs and a switch in health insurance.

Additionally, Boone has criticized the borough's proposed layoff plan, which cited the reduced number of tickets issued by the police department over the past two years as the reason for the layoffs.

The number of tickets issued by police officers dropped since 2008 resulting in loss of approximately $460,000 over the past two years, according to internal borough memos. Some borough officials believe there is a connection to the drop-off in summonses issued and stalled negotiations over the police officers' contract, which expired on Dec. 31, 2008.

Boone has stated that fewer tickets were issued in the borough due to poor morale in the police department.

Mayor Joe Tedeschi rejected Boone's claims that low morale caused the reduced number of tickets for the past 78 weeks from January 2009 through June 2010.

"They've only known about the layoffs for the past 10 weeks," Tedeschi said.

A contract resolution appeared to be on the horizon in April with the borough and PBA and SOA reaching a proposed agreement. Negotiations stalled again after the PBA and SOA ratified the agreement, while the mayor and council refused to bring the agreement to a vote.

In June, the PBA and SOA filed unfair labor practice charges with the state against the borough, claiming the borough is negotiating "in bad faith." The borough and PBA and SOA are scheduled for arbitration of the police officers' contract in October.

Tedeschi declined to comment further on the situation, stating only, "Sooner or later we're going to resolve this. Sooner or later we're going to have to heal. Why make the fire bigger?"

E-mail: liebowitz@northjersey.com and zaremba@northjersey.com
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